Virginia’s Breathtaking Natural Bridge Is a National Treasure

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Natural Bridge, Virginia’s 37th state park showcases one of the oldest geologic features on the East Coast. Part of a limestone cavern system, the bridge likely formed when the James River changed course and the existing cave collapsed, leaving only part of the ceiling intact. The history of the ownership of this “natural bridge” and its surrounding property goes back to colonial days.

rock face with initials G.W. carved into it, boxed in with white paint
This G.W. engraved in the rock is said to have been carved by George Washington

The recorded history of the 215-foot bridge goes back to 1750, when Lord Fairfax hired Washington to survey the bridge. It is said that at or around this time, he carved his initials into the stone under the bridge where they can still be seen today.

a plaque on a white pillar: George Washington surveyed the patent 1750, granted to Thomas Jeffersn 1774
Plaque commemorating George Washington’s survey of the patent and its granting to Thomas Jefferson

In 1774, Thomas Jefferson purchased the bridge, along with another 157 acres of land, from King George III for 20 shillings. He later built a two-room log cabin on the property, one of these rooms was to be used for guests. In 1833, the property was sold and the new owner build the Forest Inn to accommodate the increasing number of visitors to the area. During the 1880s, while owned by Colonel Henry Parsons, it became known as a resort. In 1998 it received its National Historic Landmark status and in 2014 ownership transferred to the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund.

a plaque on a white stone pillar noting that Natural Bridge is a Virginia Historic Landmark
At the entrance to the park

This natural stone formation is on both the National and Virginia Historic Landmark lists as well as the National Register of Historic Places and is where the county, Rockbridge, got its name. The main feature of the park is the 215-foot natural limestone arch. Until recently, the bridge was in private hands. On September  24, 2016, the property was turned over to the Commonwealth of Virginia for use as a state park.

A tourist attraction as early as the 18th century, Natural Bridge has attracted guests from all over the world to see the wonder and to explore the area. It has been memorialized in literature; Herman Melville likened the arch formed by Moby Dick to Virginia’s Natural Bridge and William Cullen Bryant said that the bridge and Niagara Falls were the “two most remarkable features of North America.”

a red brick building with white pillars and "Natural Bridge State Park" across the top
The Visitor Center at Natural Bridge State Park

The Visitor Center is a large building with a variety of merchandise emblazoned with the Natural Bridge State Park logo. Also in the center is a small food concession and information booth. There is a small waterfall, Cascade Falls, next to approximately 137 steps (one of the park rangers confessed to having tried to count them and coming up with different answers each time) that go down to the path that leads to the bridge. If you are unable, or do not want to take the stairs, a complimentary bus shuttle goes back and forth at regular intervals.

Monacan longhouse made of sticks and bark
An example of a Monacan longhouse
mud wall
Protective walls were built using sticks and mud

Today a visit to the park includes not only the view of the bridge, but also admission to 6 miles of trails on the property as well as the Monacan Indian Living History exhibit which shows visitors what life was like here over 300 years ago.

 

wood bridge leading to a roped off cave
A bridge off the trail leads to the saltpeter mine

Following the Cedar Creek Trail from the Visitor Center, you can walk across a bridge to look into the saltpeter mine. Continuing along an easy path, you pass the Lost River, which broke through the ground and currently spills into Cedar Creek . The trail ends at the beautiful 30+ foot Lace Falls. There are two other trails on the property, the Monacan Trail is a loop on the other side of Route 11, the Buck Hill Trail, another loop, is near Natural Bridge Caverns.

The bridge is easy to find near the intersection of Route 130 and Route 11, Route 11 goes over the bridge, but you won’t realize the natural wonder beneath you unless you know what to look for.

a series of waterfalls on a creek
The approach to Lace Falls

Nearby are related sites, including Caverns at Natural Bridge and the Natural Bridge Hotel. (Neither of these is run by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation which manages all of Virginia’s state parks. The town of Lexington is about 20 minutes away heading north on Route 11 and the Blue Ridge Parkway is about a half hour’s drive to the east.

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Author: Kimberly Yavorski

Kimberly is a freelance writer who loves to learn about new things and then write about them. She is rarely caught outdoors without her camera. Links to her work can be found on her website www.kimberlyyavorski.com.

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